Are games the trigger or the cause of seizures? Does it matter which?


Photo by Ron Marshall. Some rights reserved. http://www.flickr.com/photos/ronmarshall/

Online forums open to all comers have a way of passing along bad information. For example, in response to a question about whether video games can cause tremors and muscle spasms that could be seizures, the following was recently posted:

“Computer games don’t cause seizures; they simply contain triggers that people with the condition photosensitive epilepsy (seizures that occur more frequently in reaction to certain patterns of light flashes) who already have epilepsy which [sic] causes them to have seizures. You cannot “get” seizures from playing video games…”

The responder is so intent on deflecting liability for seizures away from video games that a meaningless exercise in semantics is being played about whether the games cause seizures. C’mon. The question was whether the gamer could be having seizures due to video games. The answer is a definite yes. This was not a question along the lines of “Do cigarettes cause cancer?” Distinguishing between seizure triggers and their intrinsic causes fails to answer the question properly.

This poster’s response may have been influenced by a 30-second video about video game seizures, made by an internal medicine specialist who’s made clips about a variety of medical issues. Answering the question of whether playing video games can cause seizures, the doctor, Lisa Bernstein, MD, uses this same approach of making an unnecessary distinction between trigger and cause, saying:

“Video games cannot cause seizures. What we do know, however, is that people who are particularly prone to seizures, who have something called photosensitive epilepsy, have their seizures brought on by flickering or flashing lights often found in video games. So only these particular patients are at risk for having seizures with video game. Everyone else should be fairly safe playing them.”

Let’s examine Dr. Bernstein’s statements. We already know there’s a problem with the first sentence. But there are other problems as well:

  • Suggesting that nobody except those with photosensitive epilepsy needs to worry about video game seizures encourages a false sense of security. It presumes that anyone who is photosensitive already is aware he/she has the condition. Photosensitive seizures commonly occur in people who have never had a seizure before. These people are unlikely to have been tested for photosensitivity and are therefore completely unaware they’ve inherited this condition. When hundreds of Japanese children had seizures in 1997 during a Pokemon cartoon broadcast, only one fourth had ever had a seizure previously.
  • The prevalence of photosensitivity peaks in adolescence. Thus someone who’s played games for years as a child, while the inherited photosensitivity trait is still hidden, has no expectation that the condition is present and merely dormant. The trait is apparently activated by hormonal changes in adolescence.  From that point on it will declare itself only in the presence of certain visual triggers, and sometimes, only under certain circumstances such as sleep deprivation or alcohol consumption. A history of no visually induced seizures is no guarantee of a future free of them.
  • Her answer suggests that photosensitive seizures happen only to people who are “particularly prone to seizures.” A person whose seizures are triggered exclusively by specific visual stimuli is not necessarily particularly prone to seizures. For comparison, consider nonphotosensitive individuals with epilepsy who may have many seizures every day with no known trigger.

In August I emailed my concerns about the clip to Dr. Bernstein and VideoMD.com, the site that hosts health-related videos uploaded directly by Dr. Bernstein and other physicians. Although I didn’t hear back directly, I can no longer find this clip at www.videomd.com. However, the video has been picked up by other sites and lives on.



Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s