Epilepsy Action Tweet protects Twitterverse

Epilepsy Action Twitter 2

Fantastic what Epilepsy Action accomplished the other day with one tweet! The UK-based epilepsy advocacy group addressed a Tweet to Twitter UK asking for removal of 2 video advertisements with quickly changing colors that had the appeared as flashing images. Within an hour Twitter UK responded graciously that it had deleted the offending ads.   

A major bonus–the exchange resulted in news stories in dozens of media outlets, including the Los Angeles Times, Yahoo TechFortune, and the BBC News, raising awareness of the problem and showing Twitter UK as a responsive corporation. 

Epilepsy Action followed up with gracious words, too:

Epilepsy Action Twitter 3

Using the same Twitter strategy, Epilepsy Action succeeded again yesterday in getting an unsafe ad removed by media giant Virgin Media. (See Twitter exchange further down.) For some time I have been admiring Epilepsy Action’s diligence regarding photosensitive epilepsy awareness and their outreach to organizations whose products/services place the public at unnecessary risk of seizures.

Why don’t we see this kind of advocacy in the US?

  • It’s not a priority of US epilepsy advocacy organizations to proactively protect the public from seizure-inducing images.
  • Unlike the UK, we have no regulations barring images that could trigger seizures. In the UK both online and broadcast advertising are bound by the following rule:

“Marketers must take particular care not to include in their marketing communications visual effects or techniques that are likely to adversely affect members of the public with photosensitive epilepsy.”

  • Broadcast TV in the UK is governed by a rule that, in addition to protecting against seizure-inducing content, frequently reminds the public of the risk of photosensitive seizures. No equivalent reminder exists here that raises awareness among the entire public of photosensitive epilepsy:

“Television broadcasters must take precautions to maintain a low level of risk to viewers who have photosensitive epilepsy. Where it is not reasonably practicable…and where broadcasters can demonstrate that the broadcasting of flashing lights and/or patterns is editorially justified, viewers should be given an adequate verbal and also, if appropriate, text warning at the start of the programme or programme item.”

  • Because the public is often reminded of the potential for images provoking seizures, and because the government has chosen to enact regulation of moving images, it’s not an out-of-the-ordinary event for people to notice and report problem images.

Could individuals use Twitter to ask video game companies to remove potentially harmful images?

It certainly seems like something we should try. On the other hand, there are some major differences between reporting seizure-triggering online ads and bringing seizure-triggering images in a video game to the developer’s attention. For starters:

  • Removing/altering problem sequences from a video game is much more technically complex than removing or fixing a seconds-long video ad from an online platform. Many popular video games are built over a period of years, using huge amounts of code, and allowing lots of variation in what images might appear onscreen, depending on how the game is played.
  • An individual asking for a modification from a corporation doesn’t carry nearly the same weight as an organization such as the Epilepsy Foundation.
  • Consumers’ communication about specific games typically occurs within members-only user forums that aren’t seen by the general public–thus no pressure from outside the user community.
  • These user forums can be quite hostile when the topic of seizures comes up. Here’s one quote from within the gaming community.

“…(also, if you have epilepsy (knowingly), and you try to play a videogame, you don’t deserve a seizure, you deserve to be hit by a truck, and if you discover epilepsy when playing a game, that just means you have a very very sucky medical condition, its not like the game GAVE you epilepsy, just the seizure associated with your condition, its not the games fault, blame the DNA, DAMN DNA!)”

So…I will try contacting some game companies on their official Twitter page to let them know their game has failed the Harding Flash and Pattern Analyzer in my tests. Has anyone reading this tried to contact a video game company to report that a game triggered a seizure? I will let you know how I do!!

[Update: February 8, 2016] So I forgot to post an update. I tried tweeting 8 times to various game companies about their game having seizure-provoking images. No response…and assume that’s enough evidence to prove my point that some advocacy organization with name recognition needs to take on the issue.



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